Blog Tour: Apollyon Jennifer L Armentrout

Book Cover Apollyon

So, I’ve actually decided to be a semi-social person and join a blog tour (yay me).  Actually, to be honest this tour stuck out to me because it A) Involved an author I really like and B) A book series that I  have grown to love thanks to the fourth book in the series.

Before I go into ten reasons why this series made the series for me I’ll give you a bit of tour information”

First of all if you haven’t check out other great posts for this blog tour click here.

About Jennifer L Armentrout:

# 1 New York Times and USA Today Bestselling Author Jennifer L. Armentrout Lives in West Virginia. 

All the rumors you heard about her state aren’t true. 

Well, mostly. When she’s not hard at work writing, she spends her time, reading, working out, watching zombie movies, and pretending to write.

She is the author of the Covenant Series (Spencer Hill Press), the Lux Series (Entangled Teen), Don’t Look Back (Disney/Hyperion) and a yet untitled novel (Disney/Hyperion), and new YA paranormal series with Harlequin Teen. 

Jennifer also writes New Adult and Adult romance under the pen name J. Lynn. The Gamble Brothers Series (Tempting the Best Man/Tempting the Player) and Wait for You. Under her pen name, she is published with Entangled Brazen and HarperCollins.

About the Apollyon:


Fate isn’t something to mess with… and now, neither is Alex.

Alex has always feared two things: losing herself in the Awakening and being placed on the Elixir. But love has always been stronger than Fate, and Aiden St. Delphi is willing to make war on the gods—and Alex herself—to bring her back.

The gods have killed thousands and could destroy entire cities in their quest to stop Seth from taking Alex’s power and becoming the all-powerful God Killer. But breaking Alex’s connection to Seth isn’t the only problem. There are a few pesky little loopholes in the whole “an Apollyon can’t be killed” theory, and the only person who might know how to stop the destruction has been dead for centuries.

Finding their way past the barriers that guard the Underworld, searching for one soul among countless millions, and then somehow returning will be hard enough. Alex might be able to keep Seth from becoming the God Killer… or she might become the God Killer herself.

And now here are my Top Ten Reasons why Apollyon really made me more than a little excited for Sentinel.

 

10) It Was Gruesome: Some people might not like grittiness.  But I do.  And okay, I might’ve gotten a little grossed out at the time reading some things, but I think it did add to the book.  Also,  I really loved the fact that Armentrout didn’t shy away from gruesome imagery.  It added to the story and the characters.

9) Backstory: Finally, some answers.   I do wish though that some of this backstory (cough, Alex’s dad’s story) was explained more, but it’s not like I have to wait for Sentinel that much longer.

8) Godly Confrontations: The gods in this book actually act and fight like gods.  Which is refreshing after seeing a rather lame fight between the gods and a pathetic Mary Sue in a certain book series.  And for the most part the gods have are true enough to character and aren’t falling some moronic teenager who thinks that they can replace the queen of the underworld or whoever.

7) Aiden: I’ve complained about him in the past, but here he stepped up to the line.  And he did something that normally would have me screaming at the love interest, but it actually works here.  Mainly because it was sort of the right decision for what was going on, though if most guys imprisoned their girlfriend it would be an automatic turn off for me (just saying).  Needless to say, I get why he’s swoon worthy now.  And he’s no longer boring.

Oddly enough, I feel like this song fits Aiden in the book.  Even though, technically he’s a lot like Shang not like Mulan (who the song is about).

6) Deep Symbolism: This was a book where you could actually find substance if your read deeper, but at the same time it could be a quick fun read.  Issues such as addiction and relationships are brought out in ways that aren’t overly preachy. I liked that.  I really like that.  While I am not a fan of lesson of the day books, I do like it when books have values that are subtly hidden in the text.

5) Bad Alex: Okay, I liked Bad Alex it was a great way to start a story.  I  was a little confused since I didn’t read the half book. But oh man, I thought that Bad Alex was pretty awesome if a bit scary.

4) Persephone: I’ll talk about the gods earlier, but I want to mention this one as well.  I usually hate the way Persephone is portrayed in  mostYA retellings and for that matter the underworld, but here, I really liked how Armentrout made her as a character who made and accepted her own choices and didn’t really seem to regret them.  Also, the fact that she plays video games is sort of awesome.

3) Action: Stuff actually happened in this book.  I like books where stuff happens.  Especially in mid series where usually nothing but annoying reflection is going on.

2) Love Triangle=Resolved: The fact that the love triangle between Aiden/Alex/Seth was resolved in this book made it more bearable.  I just don’t like love triangles and I’m glad we didn’t have to wait to the very last book to see who Alex was obviously going to pick.

1) Armentrout’s not afraid to show her fangirl: The pop culture (okay, Supernatural) references were unashamed fan girl and I loved it.  Which is really weird because usually pop culture references annoy me unless they are done by Meg Cabot.  However, I think Armentrout and her references to Sam and Dean might be an exception.

Overall Rating: Seven deities.

If you’re interested in the book you can purchase it at one of the following sites:

Finally, the best part about blog tours is its giveaways, here, Spencer Hill Press is giving away  $200 book card.

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Sweet Legacy Blog Blitz

I might’ve got and devoured my copy of Sweet Legacy this weekend and reviewed it too.  But it’s official release date is today.  And I have the pleasure to participate in this blog Blitz by asking the author one question.

What is Sweet Legacy:

Well, here’s the gorgeous Cover:

Here’s the Official Blurb:

Greer has always known she was privileged, though she had no idea how special her second sight made her, even among her triplet monster-fighting sisters. But when a god starts playing with her mind, can Greer step up in her pretty high heels to prevent anything from stopping her sisters’ mission?
Grace loves her adopted brother, Thane, but now that he’s back and has joined her sisters’ team, it’s clear his past is full of dark mysteries. She wants to trust him, but will Thane’s secret put the girls in even more danger?
Gretchen knows she can rely on her sisters to help her stop the monsters. But after getting to know some of the beasties in the abyss, she finds her role as a huntress comes with more responsibility than she ever imagined. How can she know what her birthright demands of her now?
The girls cannot hesitate as they seek the location of the lost door between the realms, even as monsters and gods descend on San Francisco in battle-ready droves. In this exciting conclusion to the Sweet Venom trilogy, these teenage heirs of Medusa must seek the truth, answer the ancient riddles, and claim their immortal legacy.
And here’s my question to Tera and her answer:
MJ: You have two series that incorporate Greek mythology.  Why Greek myths?
 
Tera:  Why not? I have loved Greek mythology since I was a little girl. It is endlessly fascinating. Partly because it is the origin of so much of western culture. But also because it is so rich with universal characters and stories. We have all known pretty blonde heartbreakers like Aphrodite and hot angry jocks like Ares. Themes of grief and love and war and passion are just as relevant today. The people and events of Greek mythology could just as easily be us and our friends and our lives. Personally, I love the challenge of taking something so seemingly disconnected from the modern world and making it relevant to a contemporary audience.